All posts filed under: Study Tips

Study Productivity Tips

This week I wanted to share with you some Study Productivity tips by the Study Medicine Europe organization. Random little tips all over the internet are great, of course, but having them in one place, like this infographic is even better 🙂 Save it, print it out and follow these suggestions to improve your studying!

How to NOT Get Bored Studying

School has started for me, and after only a few days, I’m already feeling pretty bored with the homework. Throughout this weekend’s fine Sunday I was very hard at work to find some ways to cheer myself up! Although it involved some relocating and redecorating (I know, it was supposed to be homework time), I was able to successfully finish everything I had planned to do.

Study Groups: Why They’re Cool

Hello my dear friends – It looks like I’m getting back into the groove, I’m feeling some academic-blogging inspiration! Hope everyone has been having a fabulous time! For a little update on my life here, things have been pretty stale except for one very important thing: I applied for a Study Abroad program and am impatiently (as in checking my application even though I know nothing has changed) waiting for an answer, which should have been emailed to me starting on Saturday. I won’t go into too much detail now as I would like a firm answer first, but beware and prepare for a ton of study-abroad related posts even if I don’t get in! In other news, I’ll be going to Europe this summer: first to visit my family in Russia and then on a crazy Eurotrip with some random dude (okay, boyfriend) all over Germany, then Amsterdam, London and Dublin. I’ll be sure to visit all university campuses I can! **Also, feel free to follow my personal Instagram account, as I’ve been updating …

How to Speed Read

These last couple of weeks have been homework-free for me. As much as I’d like to think that it’s because I did it all in advance, that’s not true. I’ve been slacking off quite a lot, and the 50-page articles that need to be read are finally catching up with me. After calculating how much time I need to read through everything carefully I realized it may be physically impossible after such a long break. So I figured now is the time to learn about some speed reading techniques and share them with you guys. Speed reading: what is it and how is it learned? I can’t how many times I’ve tried skimming through long texts, thinking I’m a pro at speed reading and not understanding why it’s so hard for others to learn. Well, it turned out I wasn’t speed reading at all – I was just looking through words without comprehending what they said, and in the end I didn’t remember anything. I’ll tell you right off the bat that speed reading is …

How I Survived Finals

Before I tell you the whole procedure, I’d like to note that this quarter was one of the most important quarters in my college career (so far). The thing is, there is a certain GPA requirement to get admitted to the Psychology Major. It’s not very high, but various past circumstances have forced me to retake a class to raise the GPA. That wasn’t fun, obviously, but I will talk about that later sometime. The point is, raising the GPA takes a lot of effort, and this quarter was extremely stressful because of that, since my admission to the major depended on it. I must say now that I did pretty well – scores above average, and good enough to raise the grades suitable for the admission. Three finals in a row wasn’t super fun, though, and it took me a lot of effort to get organized. Here’s what I did: 1. Create a study schedule and follow it. I know this one is a little obvious, like you would have totally thought of that without …

Flashcards: Make ‘Em Right!

The other day I decided to sacrifice my Math Quiz Section in favor of three hours of pure study time for the finals. I must add, I do not regret this decision, as lately things with organization have been getting out of hand. While studying for my upcoming Psychology final, which has just so many theories and hypotheses, I decided to go for making flashcards (these have some great advantages!) To make things a bit different this time, though, I put the definitions in my own words and added some comments relating to my life experiences, movies I’ve seen or songs I’ve heard. For example, one flashcard that came out looked like this: From this experience, I realized that there are several things I need to do to make my flashcard-making time worth…my time. Because if you think about it, after spending hours (sometimes even days) drawing these up, how much do you actually study from them? I’ll be honest and say that I give up the second I put the pen down, thinking that making the flashcards …

Study for Multiple Choice Tests

When preparing for a multiple choice test, it’s quite easy to relax and think “Oh, this test will be easy because all the answers will be on paper.” Unfortunately, this kind of thinking often sets us up for failure. Professors and teachers are familiar with such attitude, and make the tests even harder and more confusing. To avoid this, it’s important to study as if the test will have open-ended questions.This means that you have to practice in a way that will let you understand the material, not merely recognize familiar terms on paper. There are a few components involved in this kind of test prep, and if you do a little bit of each, the knowledge and practice will add up in the end to form a bigger picture. This is the procedure I’ve been going by in the last couple of months, which has been working out quite well for me: 1. Go over and annotate all notes and textbook readings Start doing this as soon as the quarter/semester/class begins. It’s easy to get …

Memory Techniques

If you have a hard time memorizing large amounts of material for school or work, there are several techniques that could help. 1. Give it some meaning: Information is best processed when you apply some kind of meaning to it. For example, to remember random words “baby, chicken, music, tennis shoes”, you can imagine a baby in tennis shoes dancing the chicken dance. 2. Mnemonic Devices: Rhyming, acronyms, songs, associations, anything that helps you remember the order of the words. A wonderful example of this is a poem to remember the number of days in each month: Thirty days hath September, April, June, and November; All the rest have thirty-one Excepting February alone: Which hath but twenty-eight, we find, Till leap year gives it twenty-nine. Check out these Mnemonics Generator sites: 1, 2, 3.Movie Get Out (2017)Movie A Dog’s Purpose (2017) 3. Flashcards Memorization with flashcards cannot by any means compare to any of the methods above or below. Mindless memorization can get you through only for a short period of time: if you do …