How to Change Your Handwriting

Next on my list of topics to cover is dealing with messy handwriting. It’s a common question among students, and I too understand the hardship. I’m no expert on the matter (although at one point I did relearn some cursive), so I decided to ask my best friend and calligraphy guru for some advice. Here I quote him:

“When it comes down to handwriting, unfortunately it’s all about effort. Your handwriting is definitely a large part of you and is a representation of you as an individual. As you progress through life your handwriting will evolve as you yourself evolve, but sometimes it’s just not up to par with what you expect. It takes lots of practice to change it, but it’s not impossible. It only takes a little dedication and the willingness to change. I once asked my friend how his cursive was so good. It was a very traditional cursive, not like half print half third grade cursive. It was like business cursive from the 1900s. And he told me that he taught himself. He was tired of his messy, illegible handwriting and decided to change it one day. So he started writing in cursive and kept at it until it was flawless.

19th century accounting log
19th Century Bank Book(Source)

(Source)

But the easiest way to start writing a new handwriting is like learning a new calligraphy script. You work one letter at a time. You master A, both upper and lower case, then move onto B and so on. Once you know each letter you write the alphabet all the way through in upper and lower case. Use a sketchbook to write it all out. Your practice sheets end up looking really cool once you’ve filled every space with a letter.

After this start integrating this new handwriting in everyday life. If you take notes a lot, use this new handwriting as a heading or to emphasize a word. Be creative and just start using it. Soon you’ll be able to write it without thinking and then it will become a habit. And by golly wouldn’t you know it, you’ve improved your handwriting.”

So there’s some wisdom for us all. To get us started with changing our penmanship, here are some resources and inspiration:

1. If you are learning cursive, print this out and stick it somewhere where you’ll always see it when writing. 

Printable Cursive Template
Printable Cursive Template

(Source)

2. Check out some examples of handwriting, pick one or two that you like and start practicing Read more

Android Apps for Notes

10.30.2014

This year I’ve found that taking notes digitally, that is using a stylus and an iPad, is quite helpful. So I’ve created a list of some Android apps that have similar functions as Goodnotes, Notability, etc. (this list is coming up next!)

Before the list, though, I just want to say a few words about using apps to take notes. Like to any method, there are advantages and disadvantages. For example, I constantly get distracted at my iPad. A message blinks, the lecture gets boring, or if I’m waiting for an important email- it’s too easy to switch screens…so there goes my quality listening time. On the other hand, the iPad has really saved my butt (or should I say my back?) this quarter, as my backpack would have probably weighted 15 tons if I had journals in there in addition to the textbooks.Roblox Free Unlimited Robux and Tix

1. Quill

This app is one of the better ones I’ve found, and it’s only $1.00 on Google Play. Looks like there is a variety of options for pens/pencils/colors/fonts, etc, there’s an option to connect a special digitizer pen and some options for PDF annotation.

2. Equil Note

Also looks like a great app, with very nice reviews! Free and supports the Equil Smartpen (this means you can write notes with a ballpoint pen on paper and it automatically transfers those notes into the app. Converts handwriting into editable text and recognizes 11 (!!) languages. By far, my favorite on the list.

3. Handrite Note Notepad Lite/Pro

A simpler version of the first two apps, Handrite Note Notepad allows you to simply write stuff down and see it appear on the main page. The images on google play show it being used on a phone, so hopefully it’s more spacious on the actual tablet.

4. Evernote

Definitely the best app for typing notes. Notes can be synchronized on any device (apple, windows, android) and are reachable from anywhere. I use this app mostly to take screenshots of stuff I like on the internet and then finding them in my phone when I’m at a craft store (thinking, “What should I buy today….?”)

5.  Notepad +

Looks like a great app and the closest one to resemble Goodnotes! Allows you to annotate PDF’s, take handwritten notes and even draw some fun pictures! This is the app I’d buy ($2.99, by the way).

6. INKredible- Handwriting Note

A very simplistic, neat app with a zoom in and palm rejection features, different pen options and a very comfortable interface. Love it!

7. OneNote

A Windows classic and the master of organized notes. Type, draw, hand write your notes and find them on any device. If you don’t  like any of the previous apps, go for this one and you won’t regret it!

 

I’d love to hear what apps you use to take notes! Comment below and help out your fellow students!